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CentOS Blog: CPE Weekly Report: 2021-02-26

2021, február 26 - 20:08

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc

I hope you all enjoyed DevConf.cz last week! There were some great
talks and I am looking forward to catching up on the ones I
unfortunately missed when they are posted in a few weeks!
Also if you missed the CentOS Dojo at FOSDEM, you can watch all talks
on the CentOS YouTube channel here
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLuRtbOXpVDjC7RkMYSy-gk47s5vZyKPbt

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates CentOS

* CentOS CI updated OCP to 4.6.17
* Rolled out security fixes to ci.centos.org Jenkins and cert update

CentOS Stream

* Documentation updated on the shortened CentOS Linux -> CentOS Stream
conversion, see the demo here https://asciinema.org/a/393875
* CentOS Extras is now separately delivered for Stream and Linux
* CentOS Stream 8 container images are published now to quay.io

Fedora

* We are now in F34 freeze! All changes to frozen hosts take 2 +1s
* Bodhi updates-testing activated for F34
* Fedscm-admin work started on default branches
* Openh264 repos are hosted on Cisco CDN

Noggin/AAA

* User migration script has been successfully re-run
* Lots of docs updates - check out the docs section for more
information https://noggin-aaa.readthedocs.io/en/latest/
* PR opened for changes to docs to add pkinit to docs to allow
applicable certs be shipped for packages but it seems fedora-packager
Fedora package has to be built with the change applied
https://pagure.io/fedora-packager/pull-request/166
* If you are experiencing any issues with your application
authenticating with Noggin, please reach out to the team on IRC
channel #fedora-aaa
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6
* And please report any issues you find in the repo
https://github.com/fedora-infra/noggin

Team Info Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: CPE Weekly: 2021-02-14

2021, február 15 - 17:36

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc Conferences!

* DevConf.cz is on 18th - 20th Feb! Get your ticket here if you
haven't already https://hopin.com/events/devconf-cz-2021
* CentOS Dojo @ FOSDEM was really great last week, and if you missed
it be sure to check out the CentOS youtube channel where all of the
talks are now uploaded and available to view
https://www.youtube.com/thecentosproject

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates CentOS

* Our CI infra has been updated from Ocp.ci / ocp.stg.ci to 4.6.15
* Monitoring stack updated to zabbix 5.0.8
* Kojihub now supports x86_64,ppc64le & aarch64

CentOS Stream

* CentOS Stream container images are now readily available!Check out
the mail from Brian Stinson to the CentOS-devel & announce list here
for more details on tags and where to pull
https://lists.centos.org/pipermail/centos-devel/2021-February/076503.html

Fedora

* Mass branching of packages was completed last week
* Mass branching of modules is underway
* There is already have a branched compose
* The main branch changes are also almost complete with just docs left
* tests namespace in dist-git has migrated to “main” with “master” as
symlink for now with it being removed after F34 release, so mark your
calendar!

Noggin/AAA

* Security fixes on Content Security Policy
* Re-installed FreeIPA schema to test a faster way to import user data
as part of tuning & performance testing while still in staging
* If you are experiencing any issues logging in, please reach out to
the team on IRC channel #fedora-aaa
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6
* And please report any issues you find in the repo
https://github.com/fedora-infra/noggin

Team Info Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great week!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: CentOS Community Newsletter, February 2021 (#2102)

2021, február 9 - 03:07

Dear CentOS Community,

This month's newsletter is running a little late, because I wanted to include the report from our annual FOSDEM CentOS Dojo, which was held last Thursday and Friday.

CentOS Dojo at FOSDEM

We had 216 registrations, with 164 (75.9%) of registrants actually showing up. The average attendee spent 475 minutes at the event.

Over the two days of the event, we had 8 presentations, all of which are now available on YouTube, if you missed any of them.

We started the day with a round-table discussion with the board of directors. This started slowly, but developed into a useful Q&A with the community, covering everything from CentOS Stream (of course) to the new SIGs, to deep-dives into specific technical issues. We then had presentations about various SIGs (Cloud, Hyperscale) and various use cases around the community.

Overall, we were pleased with the turnout and the interactions, especially in the "hallway" track. We are considering doing more of these events - at least quarterly during the remainder of the pandemic, and then hopefully continue them in the future, for those who remain unable or unwilling to travel to in-person events.

We would love to hear from you about what content you'd like to see at future events, or, better yet, if you want to present about what you're working on.

Upcoming events

In just under 2 weeks, DevConf.cz will be happening (February 18th - 20th). This event is usually held right before, or right after, FOSDEM, in nearby Brno. This year, it's online, with content scheduled so as to be convenient for attendees in Europe time zones.

As every year, there's a  lot of deep technical content covering a wide range of topics. We want to specifically draw attention to two presentations:

On Friday at 14:45 (CET), Davide Cavalca will be talking about the use of CentOS Stream at Facebook. And then at 17:30, Tomas Tomecek, Brian Stinson, and Carl George will be talking about Consuming CentOS Stream.

Details and (Free!) registration are available at https://devconf.cz/.

SIG Reports

Special Interest Groups (SIGs) are one important place where the community can get involved in making CentOS more useful. This month we hear from several of our SIGs about what they've been doing for the past quarter.

Active SIGs hold regular meetings, where you can find out what's happening, and where you can get involved.

Hyperscale SIG

Although not scheduled to report this month, the Hyperscale SIG presented at last week's Dojo about what they have planned, and what they have done so far. You can watch the full presentation on YouTube, and read more about the SIG here.

* Alt Arch

Cloud SIG Purpose

Packaging and maintaining different FOSS based Private cloud infrastructure applications that one can install and run natively on CentOS.

https://wiki.centos.org/SpecialInterestGroup/Cloud

Membership Update

We have reached out to all current and pending members of the SiG to confirm their continued interest as we revitalize the SiG. Once the membership lists are updated we will be holding nominations and elections for chair and co-chair.

We are always looking for new members, especially representation from other cloud technologies and we’ve reached out to Shaken Fist to see if they would like to join though they are currently Ubuntu only.

Releases and Packages RDO

Nov 16 Victoria release: https://blogs.rdoproject.org/2020/11/rdo-victoria-released. Interesting features in the Victoria release include:
Source tarballs are being validated using the upstream GPG signature, to ensure the integrity of the packaged source code..

Openvswitch/OVN are not shipped as part of RDO. Instead RDO relies on builds from the CentOS NFV SIG.
The full release notes are at https://releases.openstack.org/victoria/highlights.html

Health and Activity

The Cloud SIG has been very active in regards to creating and publishing builds though it has not held a meeting over the past months. Efforts are being made to revitalize the SiG by re-establishing meetings and grow both the membership and projects involved. At this time, the SiG is only OpenStack.
The OpenStack group is focusing on the Wallaby release, which will be available for CentOS Stream 8 once it is finished. For additional details about the CloudSiG’s plans for CentOS Stream adoption in Wallaby, and previous releases, see the following blog post: https://blogs.rdoproject.org/2021/01/rdo-plans-to-move-to-centos-stream/

Alan Pevec held a RDO and CentOS Stream AMA which is now available on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlhAhClVaEI&feature=youtu.be

Alfredo Moralejo and Javier Peña presented 'How OpenStack became boring (and successful)' at the CentOS Dojo on February 5th. https://youtu.be/H0JDgsafFD0

Issues for the Board

We have no issues to bring to the board’s attention at this time.

Storage SIG Repository Status and Updates
  • Ceph Nautilus updates: 14.2.16 (c7 and c8)
  • Ceph Octopus updates: 15.2.8 (c8 only) too
  • luarocks packages were added for upcoming Ceph Pacific
  • GlusterFS updates:  9.0, 8.3, and 7.9 for c7 and c8.  (Note: glusterfs-7 is now EOL)
  • NFS-Ganesha updates: 3.5 and 2.8.4 for c7 and c8; including associated libntirpc.
  • Samba updates: 4.11.17(c7 and c8) & 4.12.11 & 4.13.4(c8 only). v4.11.x is now EOL
Group Status and Actions from meeting
  • SIG needs to update the wiki and the calendar page moving to #centos-meeting2
  • SIG will work on automating cephadm builds
Links and other general informations

Meetings agenda https://hackmd.io/Epc35JIESaeotoGzwu5R5w

Messaging SIG

During the past quarter, there has not been much change in or with the messaging SIG, and there is nothing to report. Its artifacts are consumed by both Cloud SIG and Opstools SIG.

Release and Updates Errata and Enhancements Advisories

We issued the following CEEA (CentOS Errata and Enhancements Advisories) during January:

Errata and Security Advisories

We issued the following CESA (CentOS Errata and Security Advisories) during January:

Errata and Bugfix Advisories

We issued the following CEBA (CentOS Errata and Bugfix Advisories) during January:

 

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: CPE Report: 2021-02-05

2021, február 8 - 20:51

Hi Everyone,

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

Initiative FYI Links

Initiatives repo here: https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal
2021 Quarterly Planning timetable here:
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.
Details on initiative requesting/how to work with us on new projects
here: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc Conferences!

* CentOS Dojo @ FOSDEM is on right now! Links to talks from Thursday
are on the CentOS youtube channel and Rich is playing a blinder
getting all the content uploaded in record time
https://www.youtube.com/TheCentOSProject
* NOTE: 'playing a blinder' means doing an excellent job for
anyone unfamiliar with the term
* Fedora has a booth as well @ FOSDEM this weekend! Make sure you stop
by and say hi to all those great Fedorans who will be manning it this
weekend https://chat.fosdem.org/#/room/#fedora-stand:fosdem.org

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates CentOS

* CI team members are migrating Fedora-Infra and Fedora-apps namespace
whcih is one of the last few before we shut down legacy cluster
* There is also an investigation spike on Zabbix upgrade to current
LTS version which will then be rolled-out on the CentOS Infra once
complete

CentOS Stream

* Python39 built and ready to compose
* Dist-git repos are regularly up to date
* Repos are populated in the CentOS Stream GitLab instance and will be
publically viewable in the coming weeks
* Very detailed talks on CentOS Stream given by Brian Stinson & Brian
'Bex' Exelbierd are watchable now on the CentOS YouTube channel -
check them out!

Fedora

* Infra team are assisting with the testing of ipa/noggin for
otp/other cases in stg
* Their also doing a cleanup of a bunch of broken links on koji volume
* Mass rebuild of rpms is done, modules are underway
* FTBFS for the mass rebuild are filled

CPE ARC TEAM

(Community Platform Engineering Advanced Reconnaissance Team....Team)
We have a new sub team in our team, led by Pingou, who are running
advance investigations on some of the tech debt and bigger initiatives
that the CPE team have in our backlog and they have been tackling
Datanomer/Datagrepper tech debt first.
The team have been partitioning the ‘messages’ table of datagrepper's
DB, & hope to be able to test this setup next week
* prod like in openshift
https://datagrepper-monitor-dashboard.app.os.fedoraproject.org
* prod like with a default delta of 3 days
http://datagrepper.arc.fedorainfracloud.org/datagrepper/
* partitioned table + default delta of 3 days
http://datagrepper-test.arc.fedorainfracloud.org/datagrepper/
* using the timescale postgresql plugin [not implemented yet]
http://datagrepper-timescale.arc.fedorainfracloud.org

Noggin/AAA

* We faced some issues with IPA limits and tuning, and 2FA & still
trying to figure out the best way to enforce 2FA with sudo.
* We are getting closer to migrating from stg to prod and once the
Fedora migration is complete, the CentOS accounts will be then
imported.
* NOTE: If you have an account in both CentOS & Fedora and have
different email addresses associated with each, please update your
preferred email address in your profile and look out for an email next
week on your options.
* The work tracker for this project can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6

Fedora Messaging Schemas

* Elections pr reviewed https://pagure.io/elections/pull-request/90
* Next is Greenwave & waiverdb
* Board the issues are tracked on are here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/7

Team Info Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

 

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: CentOS Dojo @ FOSDEM, 2021

2021, február 8 - 20:20

Last week we held our traditional annual CentOS Dojo at FOSDEM. We had 216 people registered, of whom 164 (75.9%) actually showed up to attend some part of it. A big thank you to those that turned up and made it a successful event.

In case you missed it, or some part of it, all of the content is now on YouTube.

On Thursday we had four presentations:

  • The Board of Directors had an "ask me anything" session, where questions were fielded from attendees. [Video]
  • Brian Exelbierd and Brian Stinson talked about CentOS Stream. [Video, Slides]
  • Tomas Tomecek talked about the contribution workflow of CentOS Stream, and how that is the process to land changes in RHEL. [Video, Slides]
  • David Duncan talked about building elastic configurations with EC2-Hibernate [Video, Slides]

And on Friday, we had four more:

  • Javier Peña and Alfredo Moralejo Alonso talked about how OpenStack became boring (and successful) [Video, Slides]
  • Davide Cavalca gave an introduction to the new Hyperscale SIG [Video, Slides]
  • Matthew Almond talked about speeding up DNF/RPM using copy on write [Video, Slides]
  • David Duncan talked about building an image pipeline with CentOS Stream and Image Builder [Video]

It was great to get together with the community, even though it was online. We had some great impromptu discussions in the "hallway track", and it was good to see some faces.

We want to do these at least quarterly for the remainder of this year - watch Twitter and the mailing lists for announcements of dates for the next event! We would also like to hear from you what content you would like to see at upcoming events, especially if you'd like to give a presentation about what you're working on.

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: CPE Weekly Report: 2021-01-15

2021, január 15 - 19:54

Hi Everyone,

New Year, same CPE weekly(ish)

If you would like to see this report and toggle to the section you are
most interested in, I would suggest visiting this link
https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view and use the header bar
on your left to skip to where you want to go!

General Project Updates

We are kicking off Q1 this year with some familiar project faces,
namely Noggin, the replacement of the current FAS system and
continuing our development of CentOS Stream.

Most of our initiatives live here
https://pagure.io/cpe/initiatives-proposal and you can use the new
issue button to submit your own proposal.

Our updated initative timetable can be viewed here for 2021
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/time_tables/ so you know when
I need it in by to review it.

We also have updated our docs section on the initiative process we
follow as we cannot accept everything so please do check it out if you
want to understand our process more
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/initiatives/

Misc GitLab

Being very honest, I've found myself a little bit strapped for time to
give this project its due diligence over the last few months, but
please bear with us/me and expect a more concentrated effort on this
coming into Q2 (April, May, June) of this year. I apologise for the
time a resolution is taking and I really do appreciate all of your
patience.

Project Updates

*The below updates are pulled directly from our CPE team call we have
every week.*

CentOS Updates CentOS

* Community newsletter can be read here
https://blog.centos.org/2021/01/centos-community-newsletter-january-2020-2101/

CentOS Stream

* Continuing to work on Stream 8 pushes and builds
* Investigating how to automate some module pushes
* Reviewing documentation that is available on Stream currently to
identify gaps and where needs improvement

Fedora

* OSBS is building for aarm64 & x86_64 in production since December!
* All of the projects under the fedora-infra and releng namespaces on
pagure have had their default branch migrated from “master” to “main”.
* F34 mass rebuild due to start next week

Noggin/AAA

* New sprint started focusing on testing correct access has been given
per user/account
* Last remaining apps being configured & tested with fasjson API
* Work will be tracked here https://github.com/fedora-infra/aaa-tracker/issues/4
* Our open issues board can be found here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/6

Fedora Messaging Schemas

* We are working through supybot and greenwave applications currently
* There is a list of applications that require messaging schemas can
be found here https://hackmd.io/@nilsph/H1i8CAbkP/edit
* There is a readme which contains documentation on messaging schemas,
a cookie-cutter template to create the schema and a definition of Done
for writing a schemas
https://github.com/fedora-infra/fedora-messaging-schemas-issues
* The board they are working from can be viewed here
https://github.com/orgs/fedora-infra/projects/7

## Team Info

Background:

The Community Platform Engineering group, or CPE for short, is the Red
Hat team combining IT and release engineering from Fedora and CentOS.
Our goal is to keep core servers and services running and maintained,
build releases, and other strategic tasks that need more dedicated
time than volunteers can give.

See our wiki page here for more
information: https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/cpe/

As always, feedback is welcome, and we will continue to look at ways
to improve the delivery and readability of this weekly report.

Have a great weekend!

Aoife

Source: https://hackmd.io/8iV7PilARSG68Tqv8CzKOQ?view

 

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: December updates

2021, január 15 - 16:55

I usually include the below report in the monthly newsletter, and overlooked it this month. So, without further ado, here are the CentOS 7 updates that were pushed out in December:

Errata and Enhancements Advisories

We issued the following CEEA (CentOS Errata and Enhancements Advisories) during December:

Errata and Security Advisories

We issued the following CESA (CentOS Errata and Security Advisories) during December:

Errata and Bugfix Advisories

We issued the following CEBA (CentOS Errata and Bugfix Advisories) during December:

Other releases

The following releases also happened during December:

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: CentOS Community Newsletter, January 2021 (#2101)

2021, január 12 - 01:12

Dear CentOS Community,

As we enter the new year, I'm sure there's really only one thing on your mind, and so we'll start there.

As you are no doubt aware, the CentOS project has shifted focus from CentOS Linux - the RHEL rebuild - to CentOS Stream - the continuously delivered distribution that reflects what will be delivered in the next release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

Many, many articles have been written about this, and I want to take an opportunity to call out some of the better ones, to help you understand what's happening, and where we go from here.

To those who claim that CentOS Stream will be somehow unstable, I would encourage you to read Brendan's article about how RHEL is made. Things that go into RHEL are not bleeding edge or continually shifting sands. They are small incremental changes which have been baked for a long time.

To those objecting to the term "rolling release", see Stef's article about continuous delivery, and how CentOS Linux and CentOS Stream related to RHEL.

And to those who are pre-judging CentOS Stream without the benefit of even trying it, you should read Jack's article about not knocking it until you try it. (Jack's an Ubuntu fan, but makes a lot of good points.)

Karsten has written an article about the various things that are kept in balance around the CentOS project, and some of the history that led to where we are.

Finally, Scott's article about ... well, all of it ... is definitely worth your time if you want to have a deeper understanding about why people are angry, and why they are right, and wrong, to be angry.

For those of you who are planning to move to Rocky, CloudLinux, or one of the other projects that has sprung up to take the place of CentOS Linux, we wish you - and these projects - all the best. But we caution you to understand that building an OS is a big project, and it's going to take a while for them to get where they're going. Please plan your migration accordingly.

There are other things happening in the CentOS community, but we understand that this one is pretty overshadowing right now.

Hyperscale SIG proposed

A group of developers has proposed a Hyperscale SIG, which will be voted on in Wednesday's board meeting. They propose to focus on solutions around large-scale infrastructures, such as those at organizations such as Facebook and Twitter.

If you are interested in this kind of SIG, and particularly if you are running a hyperscale infrastructure, we welcome your comments and participation.

CentOS Linux 8 (20-11) released

The fourth release of CentOS 8 is now available, as of December 7th. This release is labelled 8.2011 (ie, November 2020) and is based on the 8.3 release of RHEL.

Q1 CPE Priorities

In Q1, CPE will be working on the following priorities:

  • CentOS Stream
  • Noggin/AAA replacement
  • Fedora-Messaging Schemas 
  • Flatpak indexer code merge
  • Debuginfo-d
  • Datanomer & Datagrepper V.2

We'll be updating the centos-devel list as progress is made on these projects.

Happy New Year

We wish you a 2021 that is happy and productive, and hope to see you in person before the year is out. Thanks, as always, for being part of our community.

 

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: Balancing the needs around the CentOS platform

2020, december 19 - 07:40

These past few weeks I’ve read through and listened to a lot people’s reactions and responses to our news about the future of the CentOS Project. I see a lot of surprise and disappointment, and I also see people worried about the future and how this is going to affect them, their livelihoods, and the ecosystem as a whole. I feel a strong sense of betrayal from people, I hear that.

I don’t know if my story here is going to help you or not, but I appreciate you reading it through and listening to what I have to say. The history I cover I think is necessary to understand where we are today. From here I’m going to be available on the CentOS devel list and Twitter if you want to talk further about why I think it’s going to turn out okay.

I’ve been on the CentOS Project Governing Board since its creation. I also was part of the consensus decision that we recently announced about shifting the project’s focus.  I’ve cared about this space for a long time, for my 19 years at Red Hat and prior to that. I was involved in the Fedora Project since the earliest days, leading the documentation project and sitting on the then-Fedora Board, among other roles. I led the team at Red Hat that brought the CentOS Project in closer to Red Hat in 2013/2014, and as a result of that work I earned a seat on the CentOS Governing Board, where I was the Red Hat Liaison and Board Secretary until Spring 2020.

Let’s go back to 2003 where Red Hat saw the opportunity to make a fundamental change to become an enterprise software company with an open source development methodology.

To do so Red Hat made a hard decision and in 2003 split Red Hat Linux into Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and Fedora Linux. RHEL was the occasional snapshot of Fedora Linux that was a product—slowed, stabilized, and paced for production. Fedora Linux and the Project around it were the open source community for innovating—speedier, prone to change, and paced for exploration. This solved the problem of trying to hold to two, incompatible core values (fast/slow) in a single project. After that, each distribution flourished within its intended audiences.

But that split left two important gaps. On the project/community side, people still wanted an OS that strived to be slower-moving, stable-enough, and free of cost—an availability gap. On the product/customer side, there was an openness gap—RHEL users (and consequently all rebuild users) couldn’t contribute easily to RHEL. The rebuilds arose and addressed the availability gap, but they were closed to contributions to the core Linux distro itself.

In 2012, Red Hat’s move toward offering products beyond the operating system resulted in a need for an easy-to-access platform for open source development of the upstream projects—such as Gluster, oVirt, and RDO—that these products are derived from. At that time, the pace of innovation in Fedora made it not an easy platform to work with; for example, the pace of kernel updates in Fedora led to breakage in these layered projects.

We formed a team I led at Red Hat to go about solving this problem, and, after approaching and discussing it with the CentOS Project core team, Red Hat and the CentOS Project agreed to “join forces.” We said joining forces because there was no company to acquire, so we hired members of the core team and began expanding CentOS beyond being just a rebuild project. That included investing in the infrastructure and protecting the brand. The goal was to evolve into a project that also enabled things to be built on top of it, and a project that would be exponentially more open to contribution than ever before—a partial solution to the openness gap.

Bringing home the CentOS Linux users, folks who were stuck in that availability gap, closer into the Red Hat family was a wonderful side effect of this plan. My experience going from participant to active open source contributor began in 2003, after the birth of the Fedora Project. At that time, as a highly empathetic person I found it challenging to handle the ongoing emotional waves from the Red Hat Linux split. Many of my long time community friends themselves were affected. As a company, we didn’t know if RHEL or Fedora Linux were going to work out. We had made a hard decision and were navigating the waters from the aftershock. Since then we’ve all learned a lot, including the more difficult dynamics of an open source development methodology. So to me, bringing the CentOS and other rebuild communities into an actual relationship with Red Hat again was wonderful to see, experience, and help bring about.

Over the past six years since finally joining forces, we made good progress on those goals. We started Special Interest Groups (SIGs) to manage the layered project experience, such as the Storage SIG, Virt Sig, and Cloud SIG. We created a governance structure where there hadn’t been one before. We brought RHEL source code to be housed at git.centos.org. We designed and built out a significant public build infrastructure and CI/CD system in a project that had previously been sealed-boxes all the way down.

However, the development of RHEL itself still remained closed behind the Red Hat firewall.  This had been true for almost twenty years. For the open source development ecosystem this has been an important and often painful gap—it’s the still same openness gap as 2003.

This brings us to today and the current chapter we are living in right now. The move to shift focus of the project to CentOS Stream is about filling that openness gap in some key ways. Essentially, Red Hat is filling the development and contribution gap that exists between Fedora and RHEL by shifting the place of CentOS from just downstream of RHEL to just upstream of RHEL.

Just as when we joined forces, Red Hat approached the CentOS Project with its plan, and the CentOS Board signed on to it. That plan centered around not just closing the feedback-loop part of the openness gap, but in finding a way to help evolve RHEL development from happening inside of Red Hat to outside of it.

The Board was fully aware that in filling one gap we risked reopening the availability gap on the end-user side of the equation. While CentOS Stream would be open to contribution in a way that it never had been before, it would stand the risk of being somewhat different than CentOS Linux has been.

But we also knew as a project trying to do two antithetical things at once would mean doing both poorly. Providing our community with a solid, reliable distro that is good-enough for your workloads is a strong part of the CentOS brand. We’re confident that CentOS Stream can do this.

And while I’m certain now that CentOS Linux cannot do what CentOS Stream can to solve the openness gap, I am confident that CentOS Stream can cover 95% (or so) of current user workloads stuck on the various sides of the availability gap. I believe that Red Hat will make solutions available as well that can cover other sides of the gap without too much user heartburn in the end.

Beginning now is the time to genuinely help the CentOS Project understand what you need in a CentOS Linux replacement, in some detail. Even your angriest of posts are being read, and your passionate viewpoints are being seen and understood. I’m not the only Linux old-timer working on this.

This is your chance to be recognized for where you land in the availability or the openness gap, and how it is being there, so that the people crafting RHEL solutions are doing it with your use case(s) in mind. This input is happening right now. The new email address centos-questions@redhat.com goes directly to the people in the business unit (who are not in Sales) trying to solve your problems using this open source development method.

It is hard to balance the needs and processes of making business decisions with the needs and processes of making open community decisions. Arguably, Red Hat has been among the best organizations at straddling this hard, thin line. If you trust our code enough to run it for this long, I ask you to trust us to make good decisions here. I ask you to trust Red Hat and the CentOS Board to work with you to find a way to bring the community along into the next chapter.

If you want to talk with me further, the best place is the centos-devel list or Twitter.

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: How RHEL is Made

2020, december 11 - 18:49

This week Red Hat announced its plan to put all its energy into CentOS Stream 8, resulting in the discontinuation of CentOS Linux 8 in one year’s time.  CentOS Stream, originally announced in September of 2019, is a continuous release of RHEL which provides updates as soon as they are developed and verified.  Many people who use CentOS Linux today now wonder if CentOS Stream 8 will be a suitable distribution for their use: is it tested, will it be stable?  If you want to know what to expect from CentOS Stream, the best starting point is knowing how Red Hat Enterprise Linux is built.  Let’s get into it!

Red Hat has been making Linux releases for such a long time, its original development methodology predates the agile manifesto.  Historically, RHEL has been built behind closed doors, its plans held close enough that even the announcement of predictable 6-month minor / 3-year major releases seemed a monumental reveal during the RHEL 8 launch.  Fortunately, how Red Hat makes Linux distributions has evolved, not just since calendar years started with “19”, and there have been multiple process generations since RHEL 8 launched just 18 months ago.  While fundamentals like upstream first, copious quality engineering, ecosystem partnership, and customer care remain the same, we work continuously to improve how those fundamentals are implemented.  

Let’s start with grounding: every RHEL minor release is based on the previous release, plus targeted backports of upstream development.  Often, Red Hatters are the original authors of those patches, but there are no shortcuts: upstream acceptance is the first test every patch must go through before we start it through the journey that eventually leads to a patch’s integration in the release.  Even then, this is about an upstream patch existing, but that alone will not guarantee a patch’s inclusion.

Any decision to introduce an upstream change into RHEL is a team decision and the team is large: developers, quality engineers, support personnel, product owners, and various partners all work together on priority and feasibility.  Once a decision is reached and commitments are made, only then do developers and quality engineers begin writing code.  As you probably know, in the most congenial of rivalries, developers try to write code that nobody can break and quality engineers create batteries of ways to break the code developers write.  This brings us to the second key place where Red Hat invests: tests.

We write tests for everything: unit tests, systemic tests, kernel and userspace ABI conformance tests, performance tests, dependency tests, architecture tests, driver tests, load tests, and many more.  Having tests is foundational, but it is their application that brings meaning.  This brings us to the third key area where Red Hat invests: process infrastructure.

For the last several years, Red Hat has worked on a series of “Always Ready” operating system initiatives.  The goal is as simple as the name suggests: at any moment in time the OS is ready for release.  It’s easier to describe than it is to implement. In complex systems, so many things can have unintended consequences.  To handle this we use layers of automation, incrementally building confidence in changes, before they are integrated and released into the distribution.  Here is a high-level sketch of the process every single change in RHEL must go through to be included:

When a change is targeted at RHEL, multiple incremental steps occur before it is actually included.  Changes are built, but the only certain outcome is that a CI system will run a suite of tests on the builds (the build is not yet made available for general use).  If those tests pass, a second round of preverification specific to the code change occurs (not yet good enough).  And if those tests pass, the change is tentatively included in the errata system and subject to further verification (it’s still not ready to publish).  Systemic test suites run on the combined whole to verify the gestalt functionality.  And if those tests pass, the build will finally make it into the space where CentOS Stream systems recognize it as an available update.  It’s a long pipeline and many changes move through it every single day.  For those interested in more of the vision and architecture of this system, you can read more in CentOS Stream is Continuous Delivery!

While the description of this system may seem elegant and reassuring, watching it in action can feel quite the opposite: The more testing is done the more bugs are found- and Red Hat does a whole lot of testing.  Historically, RHEL development has been done behind closed doors, isolating people from the routine bug identification and remediation process, only allowing the world to see the end result.  In the future, as RHEL development becomes more transparent, as we approach RHEL 9, this process will become uncomfortably visible.  While the testing systems are built to prevent such failures from reaching end users, anybody who wants to look deeper may be surprised at how messy operating system development can be!

Finally, for those who wonder how soon all this will map to CentOS Stream, we have good news: it is already happening today with RHEL 8.4 and CentOS Stream 8!  At the same time these RHEL builds are verified, they are also delivered to CentOS Stream.  Of course we aren’t done yet: CentOS Stream has not yet realized its mission of adding a developer community around RHEL, that is where we are headed, into a place where there are more options to engage with Red Hat and shape future RHEL.  There is always room for improvement, from better tests to more facets in future collaboration, we are excited to share building RHEL with you so that we build a better OS with and for you.

Kategóriák: Informatika

CentOS Blog: Minutes for CentOS Board of Directors for 2020-11-11

2020, december 11 - 18:49

On 2020-11-11 the CentOS Board of Directors met to discuss ongoing business.

First, the board would like to thanks everybody involved in CentOS Linux 7.9 release.

The Board was in an Executive session, where Red Hat CTO, Chris Wright joined to present Red Hat plan around CentOS Linux and CentOS Stream. A Board discussion followed.

Following up the discussion around the different users' communities impacted by proposed changes, Chris Wright, mentioned to the Board that Red Hat is also reshaping and expanding the RHEL Developer program. The details will be communicated through standard Red Hat channels.

The following resolutions were approved by the majority of the Board :

  • CentOS Stream 8 will continue with contributions for the full-support phase of RHEL 8. APPROVED
  • CentOS Stream 9 will start on schedule with the RHEL 9 Beta. APPROVED
  • CentOS Linux 9 will not start. APPROVED
  • CentOS Linux 8 ends in December 2021. APPROVED

An announcement and detailed FAQ will be prepared in next weeks.

No other issue has been discussed this month, and updates will be amended to tickets if necessary.

Kategóriák: Informatika

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